Saturday, February 4, 2012

A Little Break, A Little Surprise, and A Little Help

The Simply Charmed Blog Hop is taking a little break for the weekend.  Hopefully this will give you some time to start putting together some of your Valentines Projects ;)  Make sure to upload them into the Simply Charmed Blog Hop group when you are done so we can all see them :)


Today I received such a lovely surprise in the mail.  A dear sweet friend sent me these adorable Valentines fat quarters just to say "Thank you for being a friend."  (Sidetrack - Didn't you just love the Golden Girls :)   I had never received a "just because gift"  from a quilting friend before today and I will tell you, it brought me to tears.  Thank you (you know who you are) for thinking of me.  I too am so grateful for our friendship.  


One last tidbit . . . I was asked to teach a little class at our church on Machine Basics and some quilting 101.  It really is not a big thing, but of course, I am getting nervous about it.  So anyhow, here is where I need your help.  I try to take care of my machine but I know I don't do as well as I should, or could.  So if you were me, what is something that you would for sure want to tell a class about taking care of their machine?? 


Pin It!

25 comments:

  1. Clean it regularly, change the needle after each project or every time you clean it, never use canned air to clean your machine and have it serviced once a year. These are just the first things I thought of and what I was told.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Regular cleaning and oiling if the machine requires it; some don't need oiling these days. If it's not sewing right then change needle and rethread completely, don't assume a new needle is not the cause of the problem, some of them come out of the factory faulty. Use good quality thread; I like Mettler and Guterman.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I just heard about the not using the canned air on your machines. I would for sure remind them to clean out the dust bunnies under the throat plate whenever they complete a project and change their needles. I'm so amazed at the lint that collects with some threads. Using the same thread in the top and bobbin is a helpful tip. And get a good sewing light.

    ReplyDelete
  4. READ YOUR MANUAL!!! I know this sounds like a silly thing but do you know how many people skim over stuff (Ummm that would be me) and think they know what they are doing and well use the wrong stitch when your machine actually has a stitch just for piecing! Who knew right!! LOL

    ReplyDelete
  5. One of greatest tool to put in your taking care of a sewing machine tool bag would include canned air. It's the first action the repair person does, before oiling. Noel has shared “regular cleaning and sewing” will maintain machines.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Clean clean clean the lint out ! take the plate off and take the bobbin apart and bruch or vacuum !! oil if your machine is the kind that needs it ; and YES ! READ the manual !!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I agree with those that say to clean out the lint (it is amazing just how much accumulates after even one project!); read your manual and keep it handy for reference.
    ~Terry~

    ReplyDelete
  8. First, a unexpected gift in the mail is so wonderful. I received one from my daughter's coworker. I am always making things for her friends and coworkers and other people and people always say thank you but one day I went to the mailbox and there was a box from Yankee candle. I never spend money on candles, I always buy yarn and fabric. I read the paper inside and it had irene's name, at first I was confused until it said "a sweet candle for a sweet lady", yes that brought me to tears.

    Now for oiling, I have a Pfaff that is 29 years old. I have never oiled it and I mean never. It works wonderfully but I do clean the lint out of it all the time. That is something that seems to get piled up quite quickly.

    Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I clean out the lint under my bobbin after every project or more often if working with fleece or flannel. I also change my needle once a month. I use my machine every day so once a month is my compromise on the recommendation that you change it after every project.

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a sweet, sweet friend! That brought a smile to my face. LOVE hearing the good stuff!! OK, the one thing I would tell beginners...um, I can't stick to just one. Sorry. I will tell you the thing I WISH I had been told. 1. That machine you are using, it has a bobbin case. The case comes out. Clean under it. 2. You don't have to spend a fortune on fabric, but don't bother with the super thin fabrics, no matter the price. 3. Everyone has a learning curve. EVERYONE. Don't push it aside because you think you can't do it. Just use your resources to find your way around the curve. The manual. OK, I can see there might be a benefit to reading it. I haven't (I know I should. I haven't. LOL) BUT, I did go online and print the quick reference from the manufacturer, along with the stitch guide/chart and put the in sheet protectors in a 3 ring binder. Prior to doing that I had owned the machine for 3+ years and every time I went to look in the manual I got annoyed because it didn't lay flat (I know, I have issues!). Now I have a lot of it readily available and it lays flat, so it has actually gotten used (and been very helpful...LOL)! OK, I do know you asked about taking care of the machine, but I can't seem to stop myself...there is one other thing I would tell someone starting out...I would definitely rave about the wonders of painter's tape lol...I have been sewing a little while now and just discovered it's loveliness about 6 months ago. I couldn't survive without it now. LOL. OK, way more info then you needed out of me, but frankly i am too lazy right now to go back and edit it all down, so publish I will. LOL...Have a GREAT time teaching. You have a great blog and your ability to teach shines through it. You will be a hit :-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. A sewing machine repair man told me just this week "no matter what anyone tells you never, never, never blow dust/lint out of your machine...you can vacuum, but not blow." He says blowing it packs the dust and lint down in the bottom of the machine where you can't reach. That's from him. From me: change your needle often. It's amazing what a difference it makes. And if your machine starts acting up, doing strange things, completely rethread as your first attempt to figure out what's wrong. Often that will cure the problem. blessings, marlene

    ReplyDelete
  12. I wanted to add ... get familiar with your machine stitches and practice them. Play...try different fabric weights, stitch tension, length, before you commit to the final product.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I use a q-tip to get most of the lint out. It can pick up a lot more than a brush. Good luck with the class!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I would really want to know more about tension. The manual leaves a lot to be desired. The famous 1/4 inch would also be helpful to a beginner.

    ReplyDelete
  15. In addition to cleaning the lint out under the plate and in the bobbin case area, changing the needle after each project, oiling the machine, I would suggest covering the machine when not in use to cut down on dust and such getting into the machine. Thank you for such a great blog!

    ReplyDelete
  16. My BIL is a sewing machine mechanic and he told me to keep my machine oiled, and lint cleaned with a Q-tip. Also, keeping your Tension correct for each sewing job and/or needle is the biggest problem he had with professional seamstresses at the jean factory he worked for. Tension...Hmmm??/That could work for humans as well couldn't it?
    Blessings
    Gmama Jane

    ReplyDelete
  17. Oil it regularly. Keep the lint out. Change the needle often.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I think for sure I would read my machine manual and see what they stress. Also if you didn't feel like you had enough you could call a local sewing machine dealer and ask for their top ten tips! Have fun, I'm sure it will be a wonderful class.
    Julie

    ReplyDelete
  19. Make sure and oil it regularly. Amazing what a difference that makes in the smoothness and quietness of the machine.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Here is something I wish I had known: even if you do not use your machine for a long while, please make time to turn it on occasionally and stitch a bit on scrap fabric. This will keep things from drying out, freezing up, etc. My beloved 40-year-old Viking no longer works and cannot be repaired because it got no use for several years while I used a lightweight, more portable model for quick projects.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Clean out the lint! Pull out the bobbin case, which isn't as scary as it sounds if you read the manual. It is amazing--and embarrassing--how much lint can gather there. Once you get in the habit of removing it, you'll find that it is strangely satisfying. And your machine will thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Clean it and oil it.
    Good luck with your class

    ReplyDelete
  23. Demo where to oil it. I hear about oiling your machine all the time, but no where in my manual does it actually show where the drop(s) of oil should go. I just sent in for its first servicing (almost a year old) and asked them to give me proper oiling instructions.

    PS: I would love it if you shared your class here!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Changing your needle and the blade on your rotaty cutter will totally make your life easier even if you grumble while you're doing it!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for your sweet comments. I just love hearing from you!!
Have a Happy Quilting Day :)

Melissa